Articles, quizzes, and grammar tips for word-lovers everywhere

Tag: synonyms

A book by any other name

A book by any other name

Following on from our post about the etymology of the word book, we’ve delved into the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) to find different words for book and various types of book through time… they’re in the word cloud above, and the list below.  anagraph – a record or register of events. anagraphy – an anagraph. […]

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awesome

18 awesome ways to say awesome

As we recently asked our followers on Twitter: are you tired of the word awesome? Do you want a different way to express the same idea? Well, we’ve delved around in the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary, and come up with eighteen synonyms for awesome (in the sense meaning ‘excellent’, rather than its original […]

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parakeet-talkative

Worder to prattle box: what to call the talkative person in your life

By popular demand of our Twitter followers, we wanted to share synonyms for ‘talkative person’ from the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary. The Historical Thesaurus charts the semantic development of the English language, and is the first comprehensive historical thesaurus produced for any language. With 800,000 words and meanings, in 235,000 entry categories, […]

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Words for wafflers

20 wonderful words for wafflers

Rather aptly, there are many wonderful words to describe someone who tends to think that silence is anything but golden. If you know a talkative soul, but tire of using the same old adjectives to describe them, then today is your lucky day. We’ve delved into the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary to […]

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Economical English: the hidden connections between homonyms

Economical English: the hidden connections between homonyms

English is famous for being littered with synonyms. Sometimes the number of words we have for a single thing seems almost greedy (not to mention extravagant, hedonistic, decadent, lavish, immoderate, ostentatious, and sybaritic). The dual threads of Germanic and Romance languages that form the basis of the English lexicon are largely to blame for its […]

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mochy, mizzly, or mothery

Mochy, mizzly, or mothery? Ten regional words to describe the weather

The UK is often characterized (particularly in the US) as a damp and windy island with unusually changeable weather. The past week here has done little to dispel this impression, with flash floods in the North and muggy heat here in the South. Last week we asked our Twitter followers to describe the weather in […]

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Incentivizing proactive synergistic visions, going forward

Corporate jargon

  Have any of you out there received a memo yet informing you that 21 May is National Memo Day? No? Me neither! Nevertheless, in honour of this world-shaking event, I thought it would be apt to imagine how such a memo might read: To: all stakeholders From: Director of Insight and Strategic Marketing Subject: […]

Watch out for the birdie?

Watch out for the birdie

…an accountant found guilty of sending a “menacing tweet” was the victim of a legal “steamroller” that threatened to make the law look silly… The Telegraph 8 February 2012 What comes into your head when you see the words ‘menacing’ and ‘tweet’ side by side, as in the above? It initially struck me as being […]

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