Tag: Shakespeare

theater curtain

How well do you know the language of theatre?

All the world may be a stage, but that doesn’t mean that everyone speaks the language. Sometimes theatre can seem like its own little world, with a specialized vocabulary and coded references. (What do they mean by ‘Scottish play’?!) Check out our video to see how people on the streets in New York City did, […]

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false friends

Shakespeare’s false friends

False friends (‘faux amis’) are words in one language which look the same as words in another. We therefore think that their meanings are the same, and get a shock when we find they are not. Generations of French students have believed that demander means ‘demand’ (whereas it means ‘ask’) or librairie means ‘library’ (instead […]

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books poems

What kind of poem are you?

The wide world of poetry has something to offer to everyone. The word poem can refer to everything from the epic poetry of Homer to the imagist brilliance of William Carlos Williams. There are innumerable types of poems out there, ranging from traditional forms, such as villanelles and rondeaus, to the more playful, experimental variety, […]

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Video: what are the ides of March?

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film book quiz

Quiz: match the film with the book

When filmmakers turn to the world of literature for inspiration, often they decide that the author made the best choice for title, and leave well alone. It doesn’t take an expert to spot that Joe Wright’s film Pride and Prejudice (2005) is an adaptation of Pride and Prejudice (1813) by Jane Austen. Even with the […]

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globe theatre

Quiz: how well do you know Shakespeare’s plays?

It’s become a bit of a tradition at OxfordWords to set you quizzes about Shakespeare, and it’s a fitting celebration of his 450th birthday to do so again. In the past we’ve asked you to find out how Shakespearean you are, and whether you can spot the difference between Shakespeare and the Bible. We’ll go […]

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Beware the Ides of March! Get up to your elbows in the language of Julius Caesar

Tomorrow is the Ides of March, a day made infamous by the prophetic soothsayer from William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar. With a “Tongue shriller then all the Musicke,” he warns the skeptical emperor to “Beware the Ides of March” at the top of Act One.  Eight scenes later, the Ides arrives and (spoiler alert) Caesar is […]

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From teddy bears to berserkers – the language of bears (part 2)

From teddy bears to berserkers – the language of bears (part 2)

Following on from the first instalment about the word bear, today’s post looks at real bears, fictional bears, and (of course) teddy bears. A bear, or not a bear? That is the question. Most taxonomists agree that there are eight species of bear in five genera in the world today. However this does not include the koala, […]

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