Tag: politics

political catchphrases and nicknames

What’s in a nickname? Lyin’ Ted, L’il Marco, and the art of the political catchphrase

The US Presidential race is taking yet another twist in its long road to the White House this week, as voters in Indiana head to the polls for their primary contest. The race to become a party’s nominee is usually all but settled by this time of year, but in 2016, at least on the […]

Read more »
Make sure you get your politics words pronunciations correct!

Avoid sounding foolish when talking politics

Have a political opinion you want to voice? Do you want to take a stand on an issue? Don’t discredit yourself by pronouncing a word incorrectly. Even if you have seen a word a million times in newsprint, it may not mean you have the pronunciation down pat. Before you charge ahead into a political […]

Read more »
'Trumpmentum' is one of the words dominating the 2016 presidential race; discover which other -mentums have cropped up over the years.

Word in the news: Trumpmentum

In the physical world, momentum is a measurement of the quantity of motion of a moving body (technically speaking, the product of its mass and velocity); as a ball rolls down a hill, its velocity increases, and we say that it “gains momentum”. Momentum is often used figuratively to refer to impetus or driving force, […]

Read more »
The Watergate scandal in 1972 gave us one of the most widely-used political terms: the -gate combining form.

12 overused political terms

With the 2016 Presidential primaries kicking into high gear, the US should prepare itself for a deluge of slangy political terms. From older, tired terms to new, shinier ones, here are several words and phrases that will undoubtedly grate on the ears of those following the scramble towards party nominations. 1. flip flopper Although US […]

Read more »
Nonapology and apology tour have been added to Oxford Dictionaries.

Regretoric: the rise of the nonapology apology and the apology tour

OxfordDictionaries.com is adding the nouns apology tour and nonapology. These additions represent two related steps in the evolution of the noun apology, which first entered English in the sixteenth century, according to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Its earliest example is a book title: the 1533 Apologie of Syr Thomas More. That was More’s book […]

Read more »
Donald Trump speaks at the First in the Nation Leadership Summit in Nashua, NH, on April 18, 2015

Political profanity and crude creativity on the US Election campaign trail

As the snow starts to melt over here on the East Coast of the US following ‘Snowzilla’, thoughts are turning (and in the case of journalists, turned long ago) to the start of the primary season, when votes are cast to choose each party’s presidential nominee. It’s a complicated and sometimes very long process, beginning […]

Read more »
All the candidates in the Republican field before a September 2015 debate

The undercard debate: emerging jargon in the 2016 Republican primaries

The vocabulary of American presidential politics is colorful and extensive, full of locutions like veepstakes, Super Tuesday, and purple state. The 2016 election cycle is already introducing new terms to the lexicon, to describe a novel phenomenon that has emerged this year—the doubleheader debate. With more than a dozen major Republican candidates vying to be […]

Read more »
scottish referendum

The Scottish independence referendum: one year on

This time last year, the British press (and, indeed, British conversation) was full of talk about the Scottish independence referendum. It took place on 18 September 2014, and was to determine whether or not Scotland should be an independent country – the alternative being remaining part of the United Kingdom. As discussion around the topic […]

Read more »

Tweets