Tag: poetry

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Lord Byron in the OED

Lord Byron, one of Britain’s greatest poets, was born on this day in 1788, so we thought this might be a good opportunity to trace his influence on the English language. We have consulted the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) and discovered more about Byron’s innovative use of language. While all the words listed below existed […]

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Interview: Korean-American poet Rosanna Oh

In 2005, Congress declared January 13 Korean American Day, in commemoration of the 1903 arrival of 102 immigrants, among the very first Koreans to arrive in the US. Rosanna Oh, a young writer and Korean American, graduated from Johns Hopkins in 2012 with an MFA in poetry. Her work has been featured in Unsplendid, Measure, […]

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Nursery rhymes: time capsules of language

It’s uncanny: when most of us hear the lines “Twinkle, twinkle, little star” or “Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall”, we find our brains mysteriously capable (how many years after our youth?) of reciting the full nursery rhyme, as if on autopilot. These are rhymes many begin to learn in the cradle from parents who […]

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Enter our limerick competition and win an iPad!

To celebrate Limerick Day on 12 May, we’ve decided to hold another limerick competition. We really enjoyed reading all your submissions to last year’s competition (which had a theme of Mother’s Day, as the two dates coincided), and you can read the winning limerick for inspiration. This year you can win an iPad (4G, 16GB, […]

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Poetry quiz

Poetry quiz: can you match these first lines to their poem titles?

Many of us have memorized a poem in our day—and may even be able to call it quickly to mind right now. However, even if it’s difficult to recall at will the verses you had recited carefully in school, often all it takes is the first line or two for the entire poem to come […]

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Remembering the language of Seamus Heaney

When Seamus Heaney’s death was announced last year the prevailing mood was one of sadness; a feeling that the world had not only lost a great poet but a kind and humane man. Thinking about Heaney, as we near what would have been his 75th birthday, I was prompted to revisit his first full-length collection […]

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Everyday expressions and their poetic origins

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Our impression of “poetic” language as distinct from “everyday” language is unsurprising. At first glance, the flourishes of ornate, pre-1900 verse seem incompatible with common speech, either by virtue of their conspicuously high diction or the maudlin matters they seemingly address. One might hesitate, for instance, to liken a romantic interest to a lovely and […]

You Can Say That Again: On Poetry Reading(s)

You Can Say That Again: On Poetry Reading(s)

Invite someone to a poetry reading and, even in today’s verse-enlightened times, they’ll generally say ‘No, you’re alright’ – meaning ‘I would rather shoot myself.’ And you understand because you know how it can be, trapped in the audience of a bad reading. Now and then people are obliged to faint and the whole row helps […]

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