Tag: new words

nine worlds

Words from Nine Worlds – one year on

Oxford Dictionaries are always on the lookout for new language to consider for inclusion. Research is not restricted to printed material, but includes language used online (especially Usenet and Twitter) and by particular groups of speakers with specialist knowledge. In August 2014, while I was at the Nine Worlds convention, speaking about conlangs and generally enjoying […]

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business meeting

Business jargon in the mainstream

The business world has always had an influence on language, ranging from contributions like best practices and bandwidth, and this new words update highlights several words entering OxfordDictionaries.com from the languages of business, corporate, and marketing. solopreneur As you might be able to guess, solopreneur refers to a ‘person who sets up and runs a […]

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cupcakes

How well do you know our new words?

Cakeage, Mx, bants – you’ve (hopefully) heard about the new words we’ve just added to OxfordDictionaries.com, but do you also know what they mean? Take this quick quiz to see if you can match the word with the correct definition.

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colorful popcorn

New words from the wide world of pop culture

Pop culture has always been fertile territory for new words, ranging from television shows to 1980s films to Shakespeare. From Japanese manga to the world of professional wrestling, here are a few new words from the world of pop culture that have been added to OxfordDictionaries.com. MacGyver Although the television show MacGyver ended back in 1992, Angus […]

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Video: what is a ‘manic pixie dream girl’?

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cat café

From mic drops to manspreading: an Oxford Dictionaries update

NBD, but are you ready to fangirl over our dictionary update? Abso-bloody-lutely. We’ve got some awesomesauce new words – no, rly – that will inform and entertain whether you’re hangry or it’s already wine o’clock. Mic drop. Mic drops, awesomesauce, manspreading, and more Let’s pick that mic up again and check out some of the […]

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New information on the origin of ‘twerk’ revealed in the OED

Twerking since 1820: an OED antedating

When the word twerk burst into the global vocabulary of English a few years ago with reference to a dance involving thrusting movements of the bottom and hips, most accounts of its origin pointed in the same direction, to the New Orleans ‘bounce’ music scene of the 1990s, and in particular to a 1993 recording […]

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twerk

Freegan, yarn bombing, and the surprisingly long history of twerk: new words in the OED

The online Oxford English Dictionary (OED) launched on 14 March 2000, and since the OED generally does not add neologisms until they have had some time to establish themselves, the newest words in the early updates tended to be terms that had emerged in the 1990s. Fourteen years on, that has begun to change, and […]

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