Tag: grammar

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6 punctuation marks you might be using incorrectly

Punctuation is the art of clarifying how a group of words falls together into contractions, clauses, and sentences. Unfortunately, it is not at all clear how some punctuation marks should be used! Let’s take a look at several popular, though confusing, punctuation marks. Even if you think you’ve got the topic all sewn up, it’s […]

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5 language arguments you can stop having

Arguing about language is a passion for some people. However, Oxford Dictionaries is here to intervene and offer some insight into which arguments you don’t need to have anymore! 1. Literally Argument: Isn’t the use of literally when something isn’t actually real or happening incorrect? For some people, there is nothing worse than the figurative literally. […]

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stationery

Stationary or stationery?

This pair of confusable homophones (words that sound the same) and near-homographs (words that are spelled the same) causes no end of spelling-related fails: you can spot errors in places as diverse as blogs and online newspapers to scientific writing – no one seems immune! Does this matter? In my view, it does. These words […]

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Quiz: affect or effect?

Is it ‘side effect’ or ‘side affect’? Take this quiz to find out if you’re an ace at telling apart these two tricky words!

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10 tips to improve your writing

We’ve recently uploaded many writing tips for different types of writing to OxfordDictionaries.com, from crafting your CV to creating a short story. Today’s post gathers together sneak previews from each of the ten writing pages; follow the links to read more advice about ten different areas of writing. 1. Better writing: guide readers through what […]

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Video: what do you call a new word made by combining two other words?

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I object! (To the Russian case system)

Russian: what’s not to love? Alluringly exotic alphabet? Check. Tantalizingly challenging vocabulary? Check. Enough espionage associations to spice up even the dullest of online dating profiles? Check. But when you’re learning Russian, it’s the grammar that gets you. Like Latin, Tamil, German, and Finnish – to name a few – Russian relies on a complex […]

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Two words or one?

Is there a space between a and lot, or is the spelling alot OK? What’s the difference between away and a way? If you’ve ever pondered over questions similar to these, the dilemma of ‘two words or one?’ is one which you’ll have grappled with when putting pen to paper or fingers to keyboard. On […]

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