Articles, quizzes, and grammar tips for word-lovers everywhere

Tag: grammar

magazines pile

Why do we need grammar?

It’s not often that the word ‘inspiring’ is used to describe a day of grammar talks, but I was not the only one to think so at last week’s English Grammar Day at the British Library. With a queue out the door and tickets sold out, it’s clear that grammar’s back. After years of conspicuous […]

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Oxford Dictionaries Community

Introducing the Oxford Dictionaries Community

What is the Community? Have you ever wondered how to use the Oxford comma, or what the French equivalent of Bob’s your uncle is? Do you want to discuss selfie, semi-colons, and subclauses? Are there, in fact, questions about language you’ve always wanted to ask, and linguistic topics you’ve been longing to discuss? As you […]

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Advise or advice

Advise or advice?

What’s the difference between advise and advice? Do you know? Does it matter? Well, yes, it does, because apart from the obvious fact that one has the ending -ise and the other -ice, there’s a highly significant distinction: one’s a verb and one’s a noun. These grammatical and spelling differences involve a related semantic one […]

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Wedding

Affect versus effect: a quick visual guide

What’s the difference between affect and effect? We know that a lot of people get confused about the difference between affect and effect – so we’ve put together a handy infographic to help you out. You can even print it out and stick it above your desk for quick reference. All the essentials are here, […]

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Data

Data and media: two tricky Latin plurals and how to handle them

Your data was corrupted… Wah! First thought: I’ve lost some work. Second thought (typical grammar geek!): shouldn’t that be ‘…data were corrupted’? In the strictest sense, yes, because it’s all a question of ensuring that you match singular subjects with singular verbs, and ditto plural subjects and verbs, a process called agreement. Easy when it’s […]

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question mark

Elicit or illicit?

1. Such a question isn’t intended to elicit an answer. 2. VHF radio calls from the coastguard and other ships were illiciting no response. 3. He brazenly carried on an elicit affair with Bert’s wife. 4. She admitted to having been in possession of illicit drugs. 5. You can imagine the amount of booing this […]

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apple different from than or to

Different from? Different than? Different to?

Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me. F. Scott Fitzgerald 1926 It’s a situation that crops up all the time – you want to contrast people or things, describing how one is not the same as the other, so you use the adjective different, and decide to […]

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accept_blog

Accept or except?

 ? The British really are mad as hatters – present company accepted of course. Do you accept that the above sentence is good English (please disregard the sentiments expressed therein!)? How about these two examples – would you take exception to them? ? She excepts everyone for what they are and I think this is […]

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