Tag: Chinese

different ways to say hello in other languages

15 ways to say ‘hello’ across the globe

The main use of hello is, of course, to greet others, and it has many other variants which also are used to greet others, such as hi or hey. The first written recording of this spoken utterance was in 1853 in New York Clipper, ‘Hello ole feller, how are yer?’ ‘Hello’ is also used to […]

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food

12 food idioms in other languages

Because there are so many food-related idioms in other languages, coming up with this list was a piece of cake for us – or a ‘bread roll with butter’ as the Polish would say. If these examples aren’t enough to whet your appetite, you can add your mustard in the comment section below. 1. Mind your own […]

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wind

Weather idioms: winds and storms

We recently took a look at idioms from around the world that use rain as a metaphor; today we turn our attention to those from German, Chinese, Russian, and more, that use winds and storms to get their point across. 1. In den Wind schreiben Language: German Translation: To write in the wind What does it […]

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Sharing infographic

Infographic: Chinese language facts

How much do you know about Chinese? Our handy infographic offers an overview to the Chinese language family, introducing you to key elements such as the number of native speakers worldwide, where different Chinese-speaking populations are located, the names of the major dialects, and the different types of logographs (signs or characters that represent words or phrases) that […]

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Language Hoax Quiz

Language quiz: does the world look the same in any language?

The Japanese language has a single word that encompasses both green and blue colors, whilst the Russian language has separate terms for different shades of blue. So does this mean that people who speak Russian and Japanese perceive these colors differently from English speakers? And even more questionably: are we only able to form concepts […]

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Horizontally written letters

‘Horizontally written letters’: Japanese debates on loanwords

The use of foreign loanwords can be a contentious issue. The public attitude towards loanwords not only reveals their view on foreign influences but also demonstrates how the national language or culture is perceived in a given society. The case of contemporary Japan constitutes an interesting case study in this regard. Three layers of the […]

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q

Q tips: some rule-breaking words beginning with q

One of the first spelling rules that young children are taught is ‘i before e except after c’. Once they encounter words like neighbour, foreign, and weight, it soon becomes clear that there are exceptions. The same is also then true of another rule, namely ‘always use u after q’. There are at least a […]

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tea

All the tea in China: English words of Chinese origin

An extract from the Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins. Chinese civilization stretches back at least to the 3rd millennium BC. It is the source of many of the world’s great inventions, including paper, the compass, gunpowder, and printing, not to mention china (porcelain) itself. But maybe the greatest contribution that the country and its language have […]

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