Tag: children’s literature

The language of Lewis Carroll was highly innovative, and his books are full of neologisms and nonce words.

Alice Day and the language of Lewis Carroll

Alice Day is an annual celebration held on 4 July to mark the anniversary of the ‘golden afternoon’ in 1862 when Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a mathematics tutor at Christ Church, Oxford, took Alice Liddell and her sisters on a boating picnic up the river Thames. During the trip he amused the sisters by telling the […]

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Oxford Dictionaries for Children have chosen 'refugee' as the 2016 Children's Word of the Year.

Children’s Word of the Year 2016: refugee

Our Children’s Dictionaries department have announced the Children’s Word of the Year for 2016: refugee. The word was chosen after analysing the entries to the 2016 BBC Radio 2 500 WORDS competition, in which young people age 5-13 were invited to compose an original work of fiction on any subject or theme, using no more than 500 words. This […]

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The Jungle Book

Rudyard Kipling and The Jungle Book in the Oxford English Dictionary

“I am, by calling, a dealer in words; and words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.”  Rudyard Kipling’s linguistic legacy is apparent from the more than 2500 quotations from his works that appear in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED); the term Kiplingism even has its own entry. This turns out to […]

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Child reading a book in a garden

Enid Blyton in the OED

Enid Blyton (1897 – 1968) was an English writer of children’s books published from 1922 until her death in 1968. Among her literary creations are Noddy, The Naughtiest Girl in the School, The Faraway Tree, school stories set at St Clare’s and Mallory Towers, and the adventure series featuring the Famous Five and the Secret […]

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how to train your dragon

How to train your dragon? Try learning Dragonese

The twelfth and final instalment in the How to Train Your Dragon series was published in 2015; the book reveals whether the unlikely hero, Hiccup Horrendous Haddock III, will be crowned king of the Wilderwest. Based on Hiccup’s own account of the events, the books purport to have been translated into English from the original […]

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children's classics

Quiz: how well do you know classic children’s literature?

Since it’s International Children’s Book Day today (observed on 2 April as it is the birthday of renowned children’s author Hans Christian Andersen), we’re testing your knowledge of some of the children’s books published as Oxford World’s Classics.

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Children's WOTY

Children’s Word of the Year 2014

Our Children’s Dictionaries department has today announced the Children’s Word of the Year for 2014: ‘minion’. The word was chosen after analysis of the entries to the 2014 BBC Radio 2 500 WORDS competition, in which children aged 13 and under were invited to compose an original work of fiction, using no more than 500 […]

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peterpan

Peter Pan collars and other literary eponyms

Any avid reader has their favourite characters, whether they be from classic fiction, much-loved children’s literature, or contemporary novels. Quite a few characters have given their names to words relating to their traits or appearance – Eeyoreish, for instance, appears in our dictionaries as an adjective meaning pessimistic or gloomy, based on Eeyore from A.A. […]

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