Tag: Canadian English

Nikki's reading the entire Oxford Canadian Dictionary. In this latest instalment of our occasional series, she talks us through the letters D – H.

On reading the Canadian Oxford Dictionary: the letters D through H

As part of an occasional series, guest blogger Nikki (@exitsideway) talks us through her ongoing project to read every word in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary in under a year. Discovering the Interesting It’s been half a year that I have been vigorously getting to know the bulky companion I have come to call ‘Bertie the […]

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To date, region-specific pronunciations for words from 10 varieties of English have been added to the OED, namely Scottish, Irish, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, South African, Caribbean, Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysian, and Philippine English.

Shibboleth, Sibboleth: pronouncing international Englishes

‘Then said they unto him, Say now Shibboleth: and he said Sibboleth: for he could not frame to pronounce it right’ says Judges 12:6 of the King James Bible. The word Shibboleth was adopted more broadly to refer to language which can be used to identify those who belong (or rather, do not belong) to […]

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Weird and wonderful words from the Canadian Oxford Dictionary starting with the letter c.

On reading the Canadian Oxford Dictionary: the letter C

As part of an occasional series, guest blogger Nikki (@exitsideway) talks us through her ongoing project to read every word in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary in under a year. I turn the 379th page and breathe the tiniest sigh of relief: I’m done with C. Totaling 168 pages, it is second in bulkiness only to […]

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On reading the Canadian Oxford Dictionary: the letter B

On reading the Canadian Oxford Dictionary: the letter B

As part of an occasional series, guest blogger Nikki talks us through her ongoing project to read every word in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary. ‘You’re such a weird kid.’ I’ve heard that a lot since I started this challenge. Most people give me an odd, confused look when they find out that I’m devoting so […]

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Reading the Canadian Oxford Dictionary: the letter A

Reading the Canadian Oxford Dictionary: the letter A

In the first of an occasional series, guest blogger Nikki talks us through her ongoing project to read every word in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary. A bookmark holds my place in the largest book I have ever attempted to read – a behemoth weighing in at 4.6 pounds. It looks odd with the braid hanging […]

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How good is your Canadian English?

How good is your Canadian English?

Although Canadian English is often lumped together with American English, Canadian English stands apart as its own distinct variety of English. One of the ways that it stands apart is its vocabulary, which includes several borrowings from Quebecois French. Take the quiz below to see how well you know your Canadian English!

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twerk

Freegan, yarn bombing, and the surprisingly long history of twerk: new words in the OED

The online Oxford English Dictionary (OED) launched on 14 March 2000, and since the OED generally does not add neologisms until they have had some time to establish themselves, the newest words in the early updates tended to be terms that had emerged in the 1990s. Fourteen years on, that has begun to change, and […]

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Canadian English

Canadianisms and Canadian English

Far more than any other country, Canadians are known for turning their statements into rhetorical questions by adding eh? to the end, or even the middle, of a sentence. It’s a useful way to involve the listener in what is being said, whether by inviting agreement or just by checking to see whether the person […]

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