Tag: Australian English

The Australian English phrase 'dry as a dead dingo’s donger' is used to convey extreme thirst.

Donkey-voters and dead dingo’s donger: a new edition of the Australian National Dictionary

A new edition of the Australian National Dictionary has just been published, updating the one-volume, 814 page 1988 edition, with 10,000 Australian words and meanings illustrated by 60,000 citations, to a two-volume, 1864 page work, with 16,000 Australian words and meanings illustrated by 123,000 citations. Read on to discover what has been added, and why. […]

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To date, region-specific pronunciations for words from 10 varieties of English have been added to the OED, namely Scottish, Irish, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, South African, Caribbean, Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaysian, and Philippine English.

Shibboleth, Sibboleth: pronouncing international Englishes

‘Then said they unto him, Say now Shibboleth: and he said Sibboleth: for he could not frame to pronounce it right’ says Judges 12:6 of the King James Bible. The word Shibboleth was adopted more broadly to refer to language which can be used to identify those who belong (or rather, do not belong) to […]

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pig large

Dingoes, lizards, prawns, and galahs: taking Australian idioms literally

The latest Oxford Dictionaries update doesn’t just include individual words: as always, phrases are also included. This update sees many Australian English idioms added to OxfordDictionaries.com, and we’ve selected some that we’d like to hear more of across the English-speaking world. Some are used in other countries too; some might be unfamiliar even to many […]

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fish and chips

Grundies, greasies, and eggshell blond: Australian additions to OxfordDictionaries.com

Gidday! Don’t experience cultural cringe or get the irrits, because we’ve got some great Australian English words to share with you. Our recent Oxford Dictionaries update also sees many more terms and phrases from Australian English added. Some are used by every Fred Nerk, while some are a bit less common, but the good guts […]

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Video: which Australian words are in Oxford Dictionaries?

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reef

Australian English: eponymous words

The Australian English words recently added to OxfordDictionaries.com include a wealth of interesting words from a wide range of spheres. Among these are several that are named after people, real or hypothetical, and we have turned our attention particularly to those. While not all of these are in everyday use in Australia now, they all […]

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koala

Salties, shafters, and roos: Australian animal words

Australia is well known for its unique, and often dangerous, contributions to the animal kingdom. In March’s update, we’ve been working to bring some more Australian and New Zealand vocabulary into our dictionary, and inevitably this includes words and phrases that involve or describe some of the critters found in the bush. Pet names Most […]

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Try your luck at this Australian English quiz

How good is your Australian English?

There is an altogether different version of English being spoken Down Under. Thanks to “Crocodile” Dundee, lots of non-Aussies are familiar with some of the slang, including crikey (an interjection expressing surprise), sheila (an informal term for a girl or woman), and barbie (an abbreviation of barbecue). But there is so much more to the […]

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