Articles, quizzes, and grammar tips for word-lovers everywhere

What do you call a group of…

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Teddy Bear picnic

How did the teddy bear get its name?

Have you ever asked yourself why of all the ferocious animals in the world, humans chose bears to accompany their sleeping children to bed? The teddy bear has certainly made bears seem more cuddly and approachable than they were formerly regarded. But where did the name teddy come from? To celebrate Teddy Bear Picnic Day, […]

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Football

Side-netting battlers and giant-killing tacklers: a football corpus

World Cup fever is everywhere, so let’s take a look at some of the most popular words relating to football. The football corpus These word clouds show terms taken from a football-focused sub-corpus of the Oxford English Corpus, which looks at the most common words used in reporting and other journalism about football. We’ve chosen […]

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Welsh rabbit

The origin of Welsh rabbit

Now often known as Welsh rarebit, this dish of toasted cheese was originally known as Welsh rabbit… but why? There is no evidence that the Welsh actually originated Welsh rabbit, although they have always had a reputation for being passionately fond of it (a fourteenth-century text tells the tale that the Welsh people in heaven were being troublesome, […]

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Chocolate-covered quotations

Chocolate-covered quotations

It may well be that every day is chocolate day for you – it certainly is for me – but July 7 is more officially Chocolate Day, and gives us an excuse to (a) wolf down several bars for breakfast and (b) have a look at some quotations connected with chocolate. Curiously enough, they mostly […]

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Declaration of Independence

Rhetorical fireworks for the Fourth of July

Ever since 4 July 1777 when citizens of Philadelphia celebrated the first anniversary of American independence with a fireworks display, the “rockets’ red glare” has lent a military tinge to this national holiday. But the explosive aspect of the patriots’ resistance was the incendiary propaganda that they spread across the thirteen colonies. A rhetorical Declaration […]

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Tour de France

Le Tour de France: the vocab of le vélo

Spectators are expected to line the streets in their millions over the next few days as men in Lycra descend on Yorkshire. No, this is not a terrifying new reboot of Last of the Summer Wine, but the Grand Départ of the largest annual sporting event in the world – the Tour de France. Over […]

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Oxford Dictionaries Community

Introducing the Oxford Dictionaries Community

What is the Community? Have you ever wondered how to use the Oxford comma, or what the French equivalent of Bob’s your uncle is? Do you want to discuss selfie, semi-colons, and subclauses? Are there, in fact, questions about language you’ve always wanted to ask, and linguistic topics you’ve been longing to discuss? As you […]

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