Category: Word trends and new words

Phubbing refers to the practice of ignoring one's companion or companions in order to pay attention to one's phone or other mobile device.

How ‘phub’ made me eat my words

In the 2004 film Mean Girls, high school queen bee Regina George famously chastises one of her minions for using a slang term she has invented (fetch, meaning ‘cool’): Gretchen: That is so fetch! Regina: Gretchen, stop trying to make fetch happen! It’s not going to happen! One of the reasons this scene resonates is […]

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dumpster fire

Out of the hot mess and into the dumpster fire?

If there’s one thing that can be said for the times we live in, it’s that it has been an unusually fruitful era when it comes to words to refer to a catastrophe. The first decade of the twenty-first century brought phrases like epic fail and hot mess to prominence, and now here in the […]

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How brothers became buddies and bros

How brothers became buddies and bros

The Oxford English Dictionary’s (OED) latest update includes more than 1,800 fully revised entries, including the entry for brother and many words relating to it. During the revision process, entries undergo new research, and evidence is analyzed to determine whether additional meanings and formations are needed. Sometimes, this process results in a much larger entry. […]

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red carpet

Vlogging, celebrity gossip, and a bit of how’s your father: updates to the OED

This March’s update to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) finds us — as ever — with neologisms and newly researched and published entries for words and phrases from the whole history of the English language coming at us from all sides. With ranges including brother, call, celebrity, difference, father, foot, get, luck, and video, there’s […]

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'Trumpmentum' is one of the words dominating the 2016 presidential race; discover which other -mentums have cropped up over the years.

Word in the news: Trumpmentum

In the physical world, momentum is a measurement of the quantity of motion of a moving body (technically speaking, the product of its mass and velocity); as a ball rolls down a hill, its velocity increases, and we say that it “gains momentum”. Momentum is often used figuratively to refer to impetus or driving force, […]

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Nonapology and apology tour have been added to Oxford Dictionaries.

Regretoric: the rise of the nonapology apology and the apology tour

OxfordDictionaries.com is adding the nouns apology tour and nonapology. These additions represent two related steps in the evolution of the noun apology, which first entered English in the sixteenth century, according to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). Its earliest example is a book title: the 1533 Apologie of Syr Thomas More. That was More’s book […]

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Granny chic, Mx, and the Bank of Mom and Dad: new words in the OED

Granny chic, Mx, and the Bank of Mom and Dad: new words in the OED

It’s December, and time for another quarterly update to the Oxford English Dictionary. Fully revised and expanded entries for major items like control, fire, lock, truth, and way and from elsewhere across the alphabet bring with them around 1,000 new entries, compounds, phrases, and senses. New words added in this quarter’s update stretch from the […]

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WOTY emoji banner

Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2015 is…

That’s right – for the first time ever, the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year is a pictograph: 😂, officially called the ‘Face with Tears of Joy’ emoji, though you may know it by other names. There were other strong contenders from a range of fields, outlined below, but 😂 was chosen as the ‘word’ that […]

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