Category: Varieties of English

buns

What does ‘bun’ mean to you?

A recent poll on OxfordDictionaries.com showed that 37% of our users would call a bread roll a bun, which makes it second only to roll as the most common way to say this. This is not, to me, what a bun would be, and so naively—with no concept of the can of worms I was […]

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Check out our list of interjections!

A list of interjections you should be using

Perhaps the wildest of all the parts of speech, the interjection accounts for a fun swath of the English language, including curse words, expressions of joy, greetings, and even pseudo-magical incantations. Some of them you’ve probably heard before, but others will probably be new. Before you know it – bada bing! – we might be hearing these terms everywhere.

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philippines

Mabuhay! Philippine English in the OED update

Mabuhay from Oxford as we bring you news of the June quarterly update of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), which sees the inclusion of a wide range of words from Philippine English. English has been spoken in the Philippines since it was first introduced to the archipelago by a newly established American colonial government in […]

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pig large

Dingoes, lizards, prawns, and galahs: taking Australian idioms literally

The latest Oxford Dictionaries update doesn’t just include individual words: as always, phrases are also included. This update sees many Australian English idioms added to OxfordDictionaries.com, and we’ve selected some that we’d like to hear more of across the English-speaking world. Some are used in other countries too; some might be unfamiliar even to many […]

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fish and chips

Grundies, greasies, and eggshell blond: Australian additions to OxfordDictionaries.com

Gidday! Don’t experience cultural cringe or get the irrits, because we’ve got some great Australian English words to share with you. Our recent Oxford Dictionaries update also sees many more terms and phrases from Australian English added. Some are used by every Fred Nerk, while some are a bit less common, but the good guts […]

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Australia WWI

Rediscovering words from the Great War

In my recent book, Furphies and Whizz-bangs: Anzac Slang from the Great War, I had the opportunity to revisit some of the classic collections of war slang, including the Australian publication Digger Dialects, written in 1919 by W.H. Downing, and the British Songs and Slang of the British Soldier: 1914–1918, compiled by John Brophy and […]

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koala

Salties, shafters, and roos: Australian animal words

Australia is well known for its unique, and often dangerous, contributions to the animal kingdom. In March’s update, we’ve been working to bring some more Australian and New Zealand vocabulary into our dictionary, and inevitably this includes words and phrases that involve or describe some of the critters found in the bush. Pet names Most […]

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australia

Australian English: words and phrases added to OxfordDictionaries.com

In this latest update to OxfordDictionaries.com, Australian English features prominently. From lamington drives, sausage sizzles, and magic puddings to sheep cockies and wheat cockies – these latest additions to OxfordDictionaries.com reveal something of the colour and diversity of Australian English both past and present. Abbreviations The Australian English vocabulary abounds with abbreviated words marking a […]

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