Category: English in use

golf

Birdies, bogeys, and baffies: the language of golf

Tomorrow sees the opening of the annual US Masters golf tournament – the first of the four major golfing contests of the year, hosted by the Augusta National Club in Augusta, Georgia. Golfing jargon can seem rather arcane to the uninitiated, so here is a short guide to enable you to enjoy this wonderful event. […]

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wolf

9 words you need to know to win the Game of Thrones

With the return of George R. R. Martin’s epic series to TV screens it’s time to brush up on your knowledge of the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros. For the full story on the language of Game of Thrones read our blog post. Whether you have nefarious designs on the Iron Throne itself, or you’re just too […]

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duckling

What impact did Hans Christian Andersen have on children’s literature?

An extract from the Oxford Encyclopedia of Children’s Literature, available on Oxford Reference. Although Andersen considered himself a novelist and playwright, his novels, dramas, and comedies are almost forgotten today, while his unquestionable fame is based on his fairy tales. He published four collections: Eventyr, fortalte for børn (Fairy Tales, Told for Children, 1835–1842), Nye […]

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theatre

From early doors to blood-tub: language relating to theatre

The lure of the greasepaint has long attracted people, from Mrs Worthington’s daughter to the latest contestants on reality shows to pick the next star of a West End remake. So on World Theatre Day, await the swish of the curtain, don’t let the super troupers blind you, and get ready to tread the boards […]

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Jane Austen letters

Jane Austen and the art of letter writing

No, the image to the left is not a newly discovered picture of Jane Austen. The image was taken from my copy of The Complete Letter Writer, published in 1840, well after Jane Austen’s death in 1817. But letter writing manuals were popular throughout Jane Austen’s lifetime, and the text of my copy is very […]

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artichokes

Artichokes to zucchinis: a vegetarian alphabet

I’ve been a vegetarian for a little over half my life, and I know certain struggles that vegetarians have to put up with. But one area we don’t struggle with is language. I decided to take a mosey through various words connected with vegetables and vegetarianism, and discovered that the produce aisle at the supermarket […]

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kermit

A Muppet, moi?

With Muppets Most Wanted, the latest in a long line of Muppet movies, releasing in cinemas, what better time to check out the lingo of our puppet pals? The word muppet was actually coined by Jim Henson, creator of the Muppets, and the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) currently dates the word to 1955 when the […]

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bees

Animal phobias, from apiphobia to musophobia

One of the most popular posts on OxfordWords is our list of phobias. It’s useful for several reasons – either to get the right name for a common phobia (acrophobia meaning a fear of heights, for example), to discover some unusual phobias (nephophobia for a fear of clouds, anyone?), or to check your spelling. One […]

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