Category: Dictionaries and lexicography

robot

A closer look at hi-fi, sci-fi, DIY

Hi-fi, sci-fi, DIY. Three expressions which, for me, typify the late lamented twentieth century. Do-it-yourself The concept of do-it-yourself is the earliest of the three. Not surprisingly, the phrase is first recorded, as an adjective, in the United States in 1910: ‘the “do-it-yourself” method’, redolent of the struggle for self-improvement and self-reliance of that era. A series of ‘Do […]

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A pangram is a A pangram is a sentence containing all 26 letters of the alphabet at least once.

How many pangrams are there in the OED?

A pangram is a sentence containing all 26 letters of the alphabet at least once. The canonical example in English is “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog”, which is clearly contrived to be pangrammatic. But pangrams can also occur accidentally. For example, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) contains 66 pangrammatic quotations. Two […]

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Happy faces

9 different ways to say ‘smile’

You may be familiar with that old joke: what is the longest word in the English language? Smiles – there is a mile between s and s! Well, those of us in the know would cite the supposed lung disease pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanokoniosis as the longest word in English, and that certainly isn’t something to smile about. […]

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Explore some 'clever' clever synonyms!

8 historical synonyms for ‘clever’

If you’re constantly top of the class, or you fancy your chances playing a trivia game, you’ve probably been called clever at some point, if only by yourself. Well, to show how clever you are, why not explore our list of historical synonyms for clever, taken from the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary? […]

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New quotations have been added to the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations.

New quotations in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

The updated edition of the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations includes many new quotations from influential, amusing, and pithy people across time. Some new quotations  relate to 21st-century history and inspirational names – Aung San Suu Kyi’s Nobel address in 2012, ‘One prisoner of conscience is one too many’, and the young Malala Yousafzai to the […]

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quotations

Borrowed words: editing the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

I have been Editor of the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations for over 15 years, and the interest of the work is as keen as ever. The joy of ODQ is that its content (based firmly on what is being quoted) is unpredictable and uncontrollable: no-one, however cleverly they craft a current soundbite, can ensure that […]

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A dog chewing on a bone.

10 unusual synonyms for ‘chew’

Do you manducate? Do you chavel? The chances are the answer is ‘yes’ to both these questions; they are both synonyms for chew. Taking a look in the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary, we’ve come up with 10 unusual words you can use in place of chew next time you’re chomping on your […]

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From First World problems to last calls: notes on the OED update

beer last call

Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries, takes a closer look some of the new additions in this quarter’s update to the OED. Today’s quarterly update is devoted to the revision of several core words in the vocabulary of English, including high and low, fact, case, day, week, group, and company. The new versions of […]

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