Articles, quizzes, and grammar tips for word-lovers everywhere

Oxford Dictionaries

Articles by Oxford Dictionaries


A slice of apple’s linguistic history

apple

October is National Apple Month. To celebrate, we’ve got an extract from The Diner’s Dictionary looking at the linguistic life of this humble fruit. The apple was probably the earliest of all fruits to be cultivated by human beings. Its wild ancestor was a sharp, mouth-puckering little thing, like today’s crab apple, and this abel-, […]

What would be your Word of the Year for 2013?

WOTY

This time of year is very exciting for those of us working in Oxford Dictionaries as we are starting to think about what our Word of the Year will be for 2013. We’re analysing our databases, interrogating colleagues, and generally looking back over the past year to make a list of the words and expressions […]

Words for wafflers

20 wonderful words for wafflers

Rather aptly, there are many wonderful words to describe someone who tends to think that silence is anything but golden. If you know a talkative soul, but tire of using the same old adjectives to describe them, then today is your lucky day. We’ve delved into the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary to […]

Interactive map: places that shaped the English language

Wordsmiths and Warriors_map

‘If you love history, on your holidays you can visit museums and castles. If you love plants, you can visit botanical gardens. But if you love language, what do you visit?’ In the summer of 2012, supreme language-lovers David and Hilary Crystal set off on a tour round Britain, visiting 57 sites associated with key […]

Poll results: fount or font of knowledge?

fount of knowledge

There are few things more likely to cause fierce argument between language-lovers than variant spellings of everyday expressions, especially if one is celebrated by language traditionalists and the other by the linguistic vanguard. You may remember the heated arguments that arose over the topic of pronouncing scone (some friendships have never truly recovered) – well, […]

Should ‘tweeps’ be in the dictionary?

twitter birds

“NO” and even, “NOOOOOO!” were some of the more emphatic reactions of many of Library Journal’s and Oxford University Press’s (OUP) Twitter followers who were recently posed with the question, “Should ‘tweeps’ be in the dictionary?” OUP asked the question ahead of the publisher’s June 18 webcast, hosted by Library Journal, which explored how social […]

Video: A Very Short Introduction to Dictionaries

Dictionaries A Very Short Intro

Enjoy a whistle-stop tour of the history of dictionaries by Lynda Mugglestone, the author of Dictionaries: A Very Short Introduction, as she succinctly explains why we shouldn’t underestimate the dictionary. And find out which wonderful word means: ‘one whose hair was never cut’.   Follow the Very Short Introductions series on Facebook

Answer a question about bikinis and win a Kobo Glo!

Answer a question about the bikini, and win a Kobo Glo!

On 5 July 1946, the first bikini went on sale. The first modern bikini, that is, since there is evidence that bikini-like garments have existed for thousands of years – the mother-goddess of Çatalhöyük, in southern Anatolia, is depicted in a costume similar to a bikini in the Chalcolithic era, around 5600 BC.  Similar depictions were […]

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