Articles, quizzes, and grammar tips for word-lovers everywhere

Oxford Dictionaries

Articles by Oxford Dictionaries


What were your top dictionary lookups in April?

Search monitor

Have you ever wondered which words other people are looking up in the dictionary? Wonder no more… As part of our occasional search monitor series, we’ve taken a look at which words were looked up the most in our free online dictionary last month. We’re very happy (the 259th most looked-up word) here at Oxford […]

Gutbucket, hamfatter, and chops: the language of jazz

Jazz musician

Today is International Jazz Day and to celebrate we’ve delved into the language of this musical movement to bring you our favourite words and terms. From bebop to vocalese via the more unexpected gutbucket and hamfatter, you don’t need to be a jive-talking hepcat to enjoy the language associated with this popular musical genre. barrelhouse:  […]

A short history of Oxford dictionaries

A-short-history-of-Oxford-dictionaries-es

Oxford is famous for, among other things, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), which has been the last word on words for more than a century. It is the largest dictionary of English, covering the history of the language, and aiming to include all vocabulary from the Early Middle English period (1150 ad) onward, along with […]

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Interactive image: the life and language of Shakespeare

For many of us, most of our knowledge of Shakespeare comes from what we were taught at school. But how much can you remember, other than the odd quotation (‘is this a dagger I see before me’ sticks in my mind)? Even if you didn’t do much Shakespeare at school, or it was too long […]

Classical character large

Which classical character are you?

The many and varied characters of classical mythology played such a large role in the cultural identity of Ancient Greece and Rome that tales of their exploits have endured and have been incorporated into literature and language worldwide. The names of the characters themselves are often listed in dictionaries and are frequently associated with particular […]

March Madness: we have a winner!

Cricket ball

With only five votes separating victory from grim defeat, the sport expression that has claimed the championship title in the Oxford Dictionaries Bracket Challenge is: butterfingers. The champ Who would have guessed that clumsiness would be a winning trait in a sports competition? This slightly ironic turn of events might be deemed less so if […]

March Madness: Championship Final

Championship Final

This is it, folks. We’ve reached the main event: the winner-takes-all championship final of the Oxford Dictionaries Bracket Challenge. After three rounds of brutal takedowns, white-knuckled anticipation, and not a little bit of hyperbole, only two worthy contenders are left to complete for the title of Favorite Sport Expression. Saved by the bell Defined in […]

What is a lexicographer?

OED

Samuel Johnson, in his Dictionary of the English Language in 1755, famously defined a lexicographer as ‘A writer of dictionaries, a harmless drudge’. He also said, in the entry for dull, that ‘To make dictionaries is dull work’. Of course, his tongue was firmly in his cheek, noted wit that he was (he might also […]

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