Michael Adams

Michael Adams

Michael Adams is Professor of English at Indiana University at Bloomington and author of Slang: The People's Poetry, which includes more about The Simpsons and infixing.

Articles by Michael Adams


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Embiggening English: The Simpsons and changing language

The first episode of The Simpsons aired twenty-five years ago, on 17 December, 1989, and since then, English has never been the same. Homer, Bart, Lisa, Marge, and their friends in Springfield, Wherever-it-is, have given us fancy words of pure invention, worthy of Lewis Carroll, like cromulent ‘legitimate, but not really’, and words built from […]

Bill and Ted

The bodacious language of Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure

Keanu Reeves a linguistic icon? That would be an impressive achievement for Reeves, who turns fifty this month — when I turned fifty, no one said I was the icon of anything, let alone a linguistic one — and I’m a linguist! — but at fifty you have more important things to worry about, like […]

Who speaks Klingon?

Who speaks Klingon?

US cult TV series Star Trek first aired on September 8, 1966. From the beginning it has attracted an unusually large and engaged fan-base, some of whom have been enthusiastic enough to learn Klingon, one of the fictional languages spoken by some of Star Trek’s characters. In today’s blog post, Michael Adams investigates the demographics […]

Invented languages: from Na’vi and Elvish to Standard English?

From Elvish to Klingon

When you hear the term ‘invented language’, you probably think first of the famous imaginary languages of fiction, for instance, the mind-numbing Newspeak of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, or the Russian-based criminal argot Nadsat in Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange, or Elvish and other languages in J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. […]

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