Articles, quizzes, and grammar tips for word-lovers everywhere

Allison Wright

Allison Wright

Allison Wright is an editor for US Dictionaries at Oxford University Press.

Articles by Allison Wright


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Origin stories: fictional titles and their lasting impressions

How I stopped worrying and learned to love the language To avoid appearing like simple-minded vessels of superficial consumption, we often try not to let on the extent to which media has come to inform our lives. From the time we are young, we’re encouraged to value real-life experiences over the simulated kind found in […]

Quiz: Bob Dylan or Dylan Thomas?

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Dylan Thomas and Bob Dylan: what else do the Welsh poet and American singer-songwriter have in common besides their names? A lot more than you’d think. A tale of two Dylans It is often remarked that Bob Dylan credits Dylan Thomas as an influence. As we’ve noted in a previous post, they share thematic interests—both […]

A TV quiz (for viewers like you)

Retro_tv

The broadcast of the Primetime Emmy Awards, usually in late September each year, is the preeminent event in the US to celebrate and honor the great moments and performances of the previous television season. It’s also a prime opportunity to participate in the regular roasting of an awards show telecast by the viewing audience. Live-blogging […]

From ‘amigo’ to ‘ven’: a mapping of ‘friend’ around the world

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If you’ve ever travelled to a country in which you don’t speak the language, you’re probably aware that there are always a few key vocabulary words and phrases travel guides recommend you stock up on. I don’t speak [insert language]… Where is the restroom?… Help… Thank you. We would offer an additional word to learn—one […]

Language play in noms de plume and stage names, from Bono to the Brontës

noms de plume

With the discovery that mystery writer Robert Galbraith and Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling are one and the same, the massively successful novelist has become one of many known popular fiction writers—including Stephen King and Anne Rice—to employ a nom de plume, or pen name, masking the true identity behind their work. There are several […]

Rye

Speaking Holden Caulfield’s language

Although it’s been 62 years since The Catcher in the Rye was first published, J.D. Salinger’s seminal coming-of-age novel doesn’t look a day over 16. What’s often remarked about The Catcher in the Rye is how universal experience seeps out of a deeply subjective narrative. The story is told from Holden Caulfield’s point-of-view, and so […]

A limerick competition for Mother’s Day: win an iPod Touch

A limerick competition for Mother’s Day

The appreciation for limericks, such as Edward Lear’s nonsense verses, is well-documented here on the OxfordWords blog. As is an appreciation for mothers.  Since Mother’s Day and Limerick Day coincide this year in the US, what better way to celebrate both than with a mom-themed limerick competition? (The competition is, of course, open worldwide.) How […]

How well do you speak money?

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When the US Congress passed the original National Currency Act on February 25, 1863, a single currency for the United States of America was established for the first time. This momentous event not only brought the nation together economically, it also ushered in completely new and dynamic ways to talk about money. The Oxford English […]

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