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9 words you need to know for freestyle skiing

The 2014 Winter Olympic Games are underway, and we are celebrating this season of sport in the best way we know how: with words.

For the duration of the Games, we are featuring terminology from many of this year’s competed sports. Today’s wordlist primer focuses on:

Freestyle skiing

Freestyle skiing is a ski discipline that incorporates tricks and jumps similar to those found in snowboarding and other sports that have at one time or other been classified as “extreme”.  At the Winter Olympics, 5 freestyle skiing events are competed: aerials, moguls, ski cross, and new to the 2014 Games, half-pipe and slopestyle. Here are 9 words you need to know for freestyle skiing, although you’ll also find some of them useful for other disciplines:

corn snow (n.) – snow with a rough granular surface resulting from alternate thawing and freezing

crud (n.) – heavy snow on which it is difficult to ski

fall line (n.) – the route leading straight down any particular part of a ski slope

mogul (n.) – a bump on a ski slope formed by skiers turning; also (chiefly moguls): a freestyle skiing event in which skiers negotiate a run featuring a number of such bumps

aerials (n.) – a type of freestyle skiing in which the skier jumps from a ramp and carries out manoeuvres in the air

ski cross (n.) – an event that combines elements of Alpine and freestyle skiing with elements of motocross

spreadeagle (adj.) – stretched out with one’s arms and legs extended

superpipe (n.) – an extended half-pipe constructed of snow banks forming a high-walled channel, down which freestyle skiers travel while performing aerial manoeuvres on each wall of the channel alternately

tuck (n.) – a position with the knees bent and held close to the chest, often with the hands clasped round the shins

 

Image credit: Beelde Photography / Shutterstock.com

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